(Reference: Council on Foreign Relations) With the Hyde Act imposing restrictions on how India could use U.S. nuclear supplies, the implementation of the agreement suffered a setback due to opposition from communist parties that supported India`s UPA administration from outside. Leaders of almost all of India`s political parties had categorically expressed their aversion and concern about the provisions for the reduction of aid when India conducts future nuclear tests and the return of all nuclear material supplied by US suppliers or all equipment. BECA is the latest of four basic defense agreements between the two countries, which allow for a much higher level of military cooperation in the fields of defense technology, interoperability and production. In March 2006, the US Congress also passed the agreement and formally did so in the Hyde Act, after committee-level deliberations and conciliations were made by both the House of Representatives and the Senate with regard to the lyrics. The United States looks forward to India signing the Basic Exchange and Cooperation Agreement for Geo-Spatial Cooperation (BECA) at the upcoming India-US 2+2 Ministerial Dialogue, which is expected to take place in October 2020. The agreement is seen as a turning point in India-US relations and introduces a new aspect into international non-proliferation efforts. Since July 18, 2005, the agreement lifts a three-decade U.S. moratorium on nuclear trade with India. This article is based on “The Delhi-DC strategic dance”, published in the Hindustan Times on 27.10.2020.

He talks about the impact of the signing of the Agreement between India and the United States on the Basic Exchange and Cooperation Agreement for Geospatial Intelligence (BECA). An authorization by the Nuclear Suppliers Group to lift India`s ban has also paved the way for the delivery of nuclear fuel and technology to India for other countries. India would have the right to purchase dual-use nuclear technology from the United States, including materials and equipment that could be used to enrich uranium or for plutonium reprocessing, which could produce materials for nuclear bombs. . . .